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Lawyer speaks about legal implications for AG Paxton's lawsuit against city

In this Jan. 5, 2015 file photo, Ken Paxton speaks after he was sworn in as the Texas attorney general in Austin, Texas. Paxton, whose admitted violations of state securities laws will go before a grand jury this month, has also figured in a federal investigation of a Dallas-area technology company suspected of defrauding investors. Paxton is a shareholder in Servergy, Inc., based in his hometown of McKinney. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

SAN ANTONIO, TX - We sat down with a constitutional lawyer who told us the legal implications of the lawsuit here in San Antonio and in Texas.

Attorney General Ken Paxton sent this lawsuit to SAPD Chief William McManus and City Manager Sheryl Sculley.

Paxton claiming McManus and Sculley violated Senate Bill 4 which prevents sanctuary cities.

The lawsuit outlines McManus' handling of the discovery of 12 suspected undocumented immigrants in December of 2017.

Paxton blames the city for releasing them without properly vetting them by federal agents.

Paxton wants the maximum fine levied against San Antonio. It's police department and Chief McManus.

At around 25,000 dollars a day since September 1, 2017, when the state ban went into effect.

Texas seeks nearly 12 million dollars in fines.

Local lawyer Jason Jakob said it's not just money the state is after.

They want injunctions too.

that means the city could not have the same behavior under the state law.

Jakob said there is consequences if the city maintains sanctuary status if they lose the case.

"There is contempt and a judge could throw you in jail for civil contempt," Jakob said.

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McManus defended his decision back in December of 2017 on how he handled the suspected undocumented immigrants.

He has not spoken to the media since the lawsuit.

Sheryl Sculley called the suit politically motivated.

The city attorney told us they did not break the law.

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