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Jeff Glatz steps out of his comfort zone with 'Multiverse'

San Antonio-based singer/songwriter Jeff Glatz is stepping out from the shadow of his successful band Peacefield and will release his solo debut "Multiverse" on Nov. 15. (Courtesy Photo)

SAN ANTONIO - It's hard for any artist to change gears and step out from the confines of a band and take a stab at going it alone.

For better or worse, every note, every song, every performance will always fall on you.

San Antonio-based singer/songwriter Jeff Glatz is stepping out from the shadow of his successful band Peacefield and will release his solo debut "Multiverse" on Nov. 15.

"I tried to get out of my comfort zone a little bit with this album," Glatz said during a recent phone interview. "Usually I write mid to uptempo songs. Not a lot of love songs. So this was definitely a departure for me.

"I wanted to slow everything down."

"Multiverse" is a 4-song EP of very ethereal compositions that Glatz said has a very "night time" feel to it, while Bob Andrews of Undertow Music Collective said that 'Multiverse' was the perfect traveling companion for late night drives.

His influences run the gamut from classic 70s rock to punk rock or whatever else was playing in his house growing up.

"When I was growing up, I was really influenced by what my brother was listening to, which was everything from Neil Young to The Doors and Fleetwood Mac. Then I got into bands like The Sex Pistols, The Ramones, The Clash and The Replacements," he said. "The Replacements were very influential on me. Paul Westerberg wrote some amazing songs, especially 'Don't Tell A Soul' which I felt was the band's best work.

"I mean they had a huge lyrical influence on me."

Glatz got his start playing and writing songs with his brother Don in the Pittsburgh indie rock band Peacefield, which scored regional success with their first full-length album "Narragansett," which led to tours with The Goo-Goo Dolls and 10,000 Maniacs before, in 2006, the brothers moved to Texas' Hill Country. It didn't take long for the band to gain a huge following along the I-35 corridor as they played venues in San Antonio and Austin.

After releasing "Stars Away" in 2009 and a heft tour schedule, Glatz and his brother felt it was time for a break.

"I'm taking a little hiatus from Peacefield," he said. "I felt it was the right time to take my own musical journey."

That musical journey took him to Kentucky to work with renowned producer Duane Lundy, who he was attracted to by his work with Ben Sollee and Sunday Valley. Lundy's "atmospheric" touch was just what Glatz was looking for when he thought up the overall feel for "Multiverse."

"Duane and I were on the same page right from the beginning," he said. "When you listen to the album, it almost sounds like you're inside a movie because it has so much air in it. It conjures up so many images and takes you on a journey. And while recording, the record changed each time in the studio. Duane would add something that would just bring new life to the composition.

"After everything was done, the album turned out exactly the way I wanted."

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MULTIVERSE.


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