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Balcones Heights sees 70% drop in traffic accidents since Red Light Cameras implemented

Balcones Heights sees 70% drop in traffic accidents since Red Light Cameras implemented

Senate Bill 88, which would ban the use of red lights cameras among other items-- is another step closer to becoming law.

On Thursday, 6 members of the Senate Transportation Committee voted yes on the bill, while 2 voted no.

Red lights cameras are used is Balcones Heights to catch drivers failing to stop at a red light.

The cameras capture photos and record about a 12 second clip of violators, but never once capture the drivers face for privacy reasons.

If you receive a ticket in the mail but you weren’t the driver of the vehicle, Balcones Heights Chief of Police Darrell Volz says it can be fixed.

“You would notify us of who it was that was operating your car at the time and we will transfer that to their name,” Chief Volz said.

Windel Sample had to fix multiple violations.

“The gentleman we sold it to failed to change the registration on it,” Sample said.

That gentleman caused a huge headache. He was caught running red lights multiple times.

“You know I got a couple of notices here. How many violations has this person committed,” Sample asked?

It turned out the person was caught four times.

That's why the red light cameras have been busy doing the work of officers the Balcones Heights Police Department just doesn't have.

Last year, more than 23,000 citations were recorded and since they were put in place 10 years ago, Balcones Heights has seen a 70% drop in traffic accidents.

Chief Volz says the cameras need to stay put.

He says the most common violation is when people fail to stop at a red light before making a right turn.

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